Sunday, November 11, 2018

Veteran's Day, Will Equality Ring in 2018?


Maya Angelou in 1969. (Image source: newyorker.com. Photo by Chester Higgins, Jr.)
Ah', what did 'Ol Pressdog, nee the Dom 'O IndyCar Bloggers say 'bout Engaging the Crazies? Whilst thou OLD-est IndyCar Blogger Geo. Phillips likes to point out Not Discussing Politics upon Motor Racing Blogs...

Yet Surely, Uhm, Don't Call Me Shirley; Hya! As ironically that 'Ol famous Airplane movie featured a legendous' Black Basketball player renowned for his "Sky Hook"; But I digress...  

By now Y'all know that's not how Tomaso rolls upon thou Isle 'O Nofendersville, R' Mateys! And if Y'all Don't like thoust Swashbuckling Talk, or want some of Thy Hard Hittin' Motorsports Jabberwalkie', then please come back shortly, to see what's new on No Fenders and the 'Vurld de Motorsporten, Ja-Ja!

As ARSE-Sumedly most of thou Nation will be ensconced in Football, Righto? For which I'm sure Thar will be lotso talk about Americres' favourite ex-NFL Quarterback Colin Kaepernick; Chirp-Chirp, Bueller?


And Speaking 'O that Oh, So LUV-Able, Squeezable Hunka-Hunka Commander in Chief, whose surely merrily Tweeting Away today, Eh?

Here's another story I really enjoyed via The Guardian about when thee Donald' was just an aspiring NFL Owner. Y'all know way before he was passed over for Pace Car Duties for the 2011 Indy 500.


Still I Rise
Wayback on Rocktober' 15th early morning I caught the last portion of this overly powerful Poem being read On Air, albeit from a recording of a November 2017 Eugene Orchestra performance.


Still I Rise
Maya Angelou, 1928 - 2014
You may write me down in history
With your bitter, twisted lies,
You may trod me in the very dirt
But still, like dust, I’ll rise.

Does my sassiness upset you?
Why are you beset with gloom?
‘Cause I walk like I’ve got oil wells
Pumping in my living room.

Just like moons and like suns,
With the certainty of tides,
Just like hopes springing high,
Still I’ll rise.

Did you want to see me broken?
Bowed head and lowered eyes?
Shoulders falling down like teardrops,
Weakened by my soulful cries?

Does my haughtiness offend you?
Don’t you take it awful hard
‘Cause I laugh like I’ve got gold mines
Diggin’ in my own backyard.

You may shoot me with your words,
You may cut me with your eyes,
You may kill me with your hatefulness,
But still, like air, I’ll rise.

Does my sexiness upset you?
Does it come as a surprise
That I dance like I’ve got diamonds
At the meeting of my thighs?

Out of the huts of history’s shame
I rise
Up from a past that’s rooted in pain
I rise
I’m a black ocean, leaping and wide,
Welling and swelling I bear in the tide.

Leaving behind nights of terror and fear
I rise
Into a daybreak that’s wondrously clear
I rise
Bringing the gifts that my ancestors gave,
I am the dream and the hope of the slave.
I rise
I rise
I rise.

From And Still I Rise by Maya Angelou, 1978
(Source: poets.org)

Black Female Pioneers...
Once again, I'm struck over how pervasive the Media is in concealing so much from us! As I'd still never have heard of the late Maya Angelou if I'd not turned on thou radio to catch the last snippets of her powerful poem Booming out of the speaker, by pure Happenstance.

And I still know very little about the writer Maya Angelou, only surreptitiously learning her name four years after her passing. Other than she came to national prominence with the publishing of her first memoir in 1969, the critically acclaimed I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, which would be the first of her many memoirs published.


Whilst another unknown le Femme trail blazer to Mwah is Raye Montague, who somehow seemingly got overlooked in the book Hidden Figures, which I scribble 'bout previously over at Sportyblog in;


As Raye Montague wasn't involved in the Space Race per sei, but instead revolutionized the way that the U.S. Navy built ships upon creating the first Computer systems program developed to speed-up Ship design.


And lastly, in this very short selection of Black Female Pioneers, I ran across another name in the New York Times Obituary section, about a prominent Black Female Pianist and Teacher.

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